Rhody Pets: Ensure your dog has a safe Thanksgiving with these do’s and don’ts

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Thanksgiving is synonymous with feasting and gratitude, and one of the best ways you can say thanks to your furry friend is to feed them right. Before you fill Fido’s dish with fixings and trimmings, read these do’s and don’ts from Johnna Devereaux, clinical pet nutritionist at holistic pet boutique and supply store Fetch RI in Wyoming.

YES, PLEASE

Turkey: Devereaux says dogs can enjoy a little bit of turkey but just muscle or breast meat, no bones, skin, or excess fat. They may love drippings and skin, but these can cause severe digestive issues.

Cranberries: Pass on the sauce but fresh cranberries are chock full of vitamin C and antioxidants. Make sure to puree before mixing into your dog’s food; otherwise their bodies won’t be able to absorb the beneficial nutrients.

Green beans: Fresh, organic green beans are a great way to help satiate your pup when they are feeling extra hungry, plus it fills them up and delivers very few calories per bite. Serve to Fido plain before adding butter or making the famed casserole.

Pumpkin: Not pumpkin pie filling, but organic, canned 100 percent pumpkin is perfectly fine. Use it to fill your pup’s favorite puzzle toy or mix it with a few treats and freeze.

Long-term chew: Keep your dog occupied and entertained while you and your guests eat with a yak cheese chew, bully stick, split deer, elk antler, or marrow bone.

NO THANKS

Potatoes: White potatoes are part of the nightshade family of plants, which cause inflammation in the body, aggravating sore, achy joints.

Cooked bones: Cooked bones lose all of their moisture and nutrients during the process and become brittle and prone to splintering, which may cause internal perforation.

Stuffing: Onions are toxic to dogs.

Sweets/desserts: Dogs have no need for sugar in their diet and if your dessert contains chocolate, your dog is in for a double whammy. Sugar-free is also a big no-no as these snacks often contain xylitol, which is extremely toxic to dogs.

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